This Week in the American Civil War: March 9-15, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday March 9, 1864

The President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, in the presence of his Cabinet, officially handed Ulysses S. Grant his commission as lieutenant general. In the brief White House ceremony, both Lincoln and Grant uttered perfunctory remarks. Grant then discussed in private, his plans for future operations, with the president.

Thursday March 10, 1864

Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant was given the official authority to take command of the Armies of the United States, but the general himself had already left for Virginia to meet with Major General George G. Meade with the Army of the Potomac. The generals discussed the position, condition and future of the army, and worked out their relationship to each other. Grant expected himself to be in the field with his army commander.

Federal Major General Franz Sigel superseded Brigadier General Benjamin F. Kelley in command of the Federal Department of West Virginia.

Confederate raiders hit Clinton and Mayfield, Kentucky, while skirmishing broke out near Charles Town and Kabletown, West Virginia.

Friday March 11, 1864

Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant returned to Washington, then left in the evening to visit with Major General William T. Sherman, now slated to be the commander in the West. 

Saturday March 12, 1864

The official order setting up the new top command of the United States Armies was announced. Major General Halleck was relieved at his own request as General-in-Chief, and named chief of staff. Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant was assigned to command of all the armies. Major General William T. Sherman was assigned to the Military Division of the Mississippi, commanding the Departments of the Ohio, the Cumberland, the Tennessee, and the Arkansas. Major General J.B. McPherson replaced Sherman in command of the Department and Army of the Tennessee.

On the Mississippi River, Major General Nathaniel Banks led his army, and gunboats, up the Red River into the heart of Louisiana in the “Red River Campaign.”

Confederate President Jefferson Davis suspended the execution of a deserter.

Sunday March 13, 1864

     Skirmishing occurred at Cheek’s Cross Roads and Spring Hill, Tennessee; Carrollton, Arkansas; and Los Patricios, Texas.

Federal Major General Nathaniel Banks’s army continued to make their way up the Red River into Louisiana.

Monday March 14, 1864

The advance of Major General Nathaniel Bank’s Red River expedition captured Fort De Russy near Simsport, Louisiana. Brigadier General Andrew Jackson Smith, with his troops from Sherman’s old command, did the job with little difficulty.

Skirmishing erupted at Bent Creek, Tennessee; Claysville, Alabama; Jones County, Mississippi; and Hopefield, Arkansas. Fort Sumter was hit by another bombardment, with 143 rounds fired by the Federals.

President Abraham Lincoln issued a draft order for 200,000 men for the Navy and to provide “an adequate reserve force for all contingencies” in the entire military service.

Tuesday March 15, 1864

Louisiana Governor Michael Hahn was invested with powers previously held by the military governor of Louisiana as President Abraham Lincoln acted to reconstruct occupied areas of the South. The President also proclaimed that the United States should not “take charge of any church as such” in New Orleans.

Federal gunboats on the Red River arrived at Alexandria, Louisiana, as the expedition of men and vessels proceeded up the most important Confederate-held river. A skirmish at Marksville Prairie on this date was part of that campaign.

Skirmishing also occurred at Bull’s Gap and Flat Creek, Tennessee; and at Clarendon, Arkansas.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of March 9-15, 1864

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Fort Snelling prior to mustering out of Federal service.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Marched to Canton and then to Vicksburg, Mississippi as part of the Red River Campaign.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive. 

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling until May 1, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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This Week in the American Civil War: March 2-8, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday March 2, 1864

The U.S. Senate confirmed the nomination of Ulysses Grant as lieutenant general.

Federal Colonel Ulric Dahlgren led his cavalry into a Confederate ambush at Mantapike Hill between King and Queen Court House and King William’s Court House in Virginia. During the night, Dahlgren fell into the trap and was killed and over a hundred of his cavalrymen were captured.

Having acted as a decoy during Kilpatrick’s raid, Brigadier General George A. Custer returned to Union lines from his own fairly successful raid in the Albemarle area of Virginia.

Thursday March 3, 1864

Skirmishes occurred at Liverpool and Brownsville, Mississippi; Petersburg, West Virginia; at Jackson and near Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

The Federal Treasury was authorized by Congress to issue $200 million in ten-year bonds.

Major General Ulysses Grant was ordered to Washington to receive his commission as lieutenant general.

Friday March 4, 1864

The U.S. Senate confirmed Andrew Johnson as the Federal Military Governor of Tennessee. In New Orleans, the new pro-Union Louisiana government of Governor Michael Hahn took office.

Admiral John A. Dahlgren called on President Abraham Lincoln to learn the fate of his son, Colonel Ulric Dahlgren, whose death near Richmond, Virginia was not yet known in Washington. 

Saturday March 5, 1864

The Confederate government ordered every vessel to give one half of its freight capacity to government shipments. This was an effort to cut down on private profit from blockade-running and to aid the government in obtaining badly needed supplies.

Major General John C. Breckinridge assumed command of the Confederate Department of Western Virginia.

Fighting centered at Leet’s Tanyard, Georgia, Panther Springs, Tennessee; and Yazoo City, Mississippi.

A telegraph station and two small Federal steamers were seized in a daring raid by Confederates under Commodore John Taylor Wood at Cherrystone Point, Virginia.

Sunday March 6, 1864

     Federal forces, after being attacked the preceding day, pulled out of Yazoo City, Mississippi.

Confederate torpedo boats failed in an attack on the U.S.S. Memphis in North Edisto River, South Carolina.

Confederate raiders attacked Union pickets at Columbus, Kentucky and there was an affair near Island No. 10 on the Mississippi River near New Madrid, Missouri. Skirmishing also occurred at Flint Creek, Arkansas; and Snickersville, Virginia.

Monday March 7, 1864

Fighting was limited to skirmishes at Decatur, Alabama; and Brownsville, Mississippi.

President Abraham Lincoln issued an order designating the starting point of the Union Pacific Railroad at Council Bluffs, Iowa, on the state’s western boundary with Nebraska.

Lincoln also wrote to Congressman John A.J. Creswell of Maryland that while he had preferred gradual emancipation for slaves in Maryland, he had no objection to immediate emancipation.

Tuesday March 8, 1864

At the White House, a disheveled Major General Ulysses Grant met President Abraham Lincoln in the East Room amid cheering and handclapping. This was the first time they met. Both men appeared somewhat embarrassed and little was said.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of March 2-8, 1864 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Fort Snelling prior to mustering out of Federal service.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Marched to Canton and then to Vicksburg, Mississippi as part of the Red River Campaign.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive. 

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling until May 1, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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This Week in the American Civil War: February 24-March 1, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday February 24, 1864

Confederate General Braxton Bragg was charged with the conduct of military operations in the Armies of the Confederacy, thus becoming in effect, chief-of-staff. Bragg, though still controversial, still enjoyed the trust of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, but his reputation had suffered from his defeat at Missionary Ridge and the constant conflicts with his generals.

The U.S. Senate passed a measure to revive the rank of lieutenant general, with Major General Ulysses Grant being clearly in mind. President Abraham Lincoln approved an act of Congress to compensate every Union master whose slaves enlisted in the Army, with the sum not to exceed $300 and the volunteer was to become free. The act also increased bounties for volunteers, redefined quota credits, increased penalties for draft resistance, subjected Negroes to the draft, provided that those who opposed bearing arms for religious reasons should be assigned non-combatant tasks with freedmen or in hospitals, and gave the President authority to call for such men as required.

Thursday February 25, 1864

Federal forces under Major General J.M. Palmer made their main effort at Buzzard Roost in the Demonstration on Dalton, Georgia. General Joseph E. Johnston’s Confederate positions proved too strong for the limited probing attack, and Palmer withdrew his forces to the main line of the Army of the Cumberland.

Confederate Major General John C. Breckinridge was assigned to command the Trans-Allegheny Department or Western Department of Virginia, relieving Major General Samuel Jones.

Friday February 26, 1864

Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s troops skirmished near Canton, Mississippi as their withdrawal after the successful Meridian Campaign neared completion.

A memorandum from President Abraham Lincoln confirmed his confidence in Major General Benjamin Butler and asked that the controversial general be sustained in his efforts. Lincoln also ordered that the death sentence of all deserters be commuted to imprisonment during the war, thus continuing his policy of leniency. The U.S. Senate completed passage of the bill that revived the rank of lieutenant general. 

Saturday February 27, 1864

Near the town of Americus, Georgia, Federal prisoners of war began arriving at an unfinished prison camp, officially Camp Sumter, but known to history as Andersonville. Insufficient food, shelter, clothing, and accommodations soon made the prison notorious.

Sunday February 28, 1864

     After preliminary planning in Washington, D.C., a 3,500-trooper strong Federal cavalry force under Brigadier General Judson Kilpatrick left the Rapidan River, intent on penetrating weakly held Richmond, Virginia and releasing Federal prisoners there.

Monday February 29, 1864

President Abraham Lincoln approved the congressional act reviving the grade of lieutenant general. It was clear that Congress and the President had Major General Ulysses S. Grant in mind for this promotion, the highest rank in the U.S. Army since George Washington’s time. Now retired, Winfield Scott was lieutenant general by brevet only.

Tuesday March 1, 1864

Both branches of the Federal cavalry raid on Richmond, Virginia were within a few miles of the Confederate capital. Wounded, veterans, office and factory workers, and home guards rallied to defend their city. Brigadier General Judson Kilpatrick approached with the larger Union force but decided against assault as the outer fortifications were too well manned. Kilpatrick turned east toward the Chickahominy River and the Peninsula. Colonel Ulric Dahlgren and his five hundred men coming from the west approached to within a little over two miles of Richmond by nightfall. Realizing that Kilpatrick had failed, Dahlgren withdrew in the dark, wet night.

As expected, President Abraham Lincoln nominated Major General Ulysses S. Grant for the newly created rank of lieutenant general.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of February 24-March 1, 1864 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Fort Snelling prior to mustering out of Federal service.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – At Black River Bridge, Mississippi, for duty during the Meridian Campaign.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive. 

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – The veteranized battalion arrived in Minnesota from Alabama and was on duty at Fort Snelling.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A,B,C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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This Week in the American Civil War: February 17-23, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday February 17, 1864

HUNLEY ATTACKS HOUSATONIC

About 8:45 p.m., an officer of the sloop U.S.S. Housatonic, on duty off of Charleston, South Carolina, spotted “something in the water” speeding towards the ship. A torpedo struck the ship near the magazine causing an explosion. The Housatonic sank rapidly, stern first. All but five of the crew was saved.

The attacker was the C.S.S. H.L. Hunley, an experimental “semi-submersible” that was cigar-shaped with a torpedo or mine at the end of a long spar in the prow. After attacking the Housatonic, the explosion from the torpedo caused the Hunley’s demise.  All eight crewmembers perished. The Hunley was discovered in 1995, recovered in 2000 and is now on display in Charleston.

The First Confederate Congress adjourned its fourth session amid overt discontent with the Davis Administration and the progress of the war.

Thursday February 18, 1864

Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s force at Meridian, Mississippi continued to disrupt Confederate railroads and supply depots.

Skirmishing occurred at Aberdeen, Mississippi; Mifflin, Maryville and Sevierville, Tennessee; Ringgold, Georgia and on the Piney River in Missouri.

President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation lifting the Federal blockade at Brownsville, Texas, allowing for normal trade as long as there was no commerce in military articles.

Friday February 19, 1864

Confederate President Jefferson Davis asked Admiral Franklin Buchanan what his plans were for defeating a reported naval demonstration on Mobile, Alabama.

Fighting occurred at Brown’s Ferry, Alabama; Houston, Egypt Station and Meridian, Mississippi; Grossetete, Louisiana; Independence, Missouri and at Waugh’s Farm near Batesville, Arkansas. 

Saturday February 20, 1864

BATTLE OF OLUSTEE, FLORIDA

Brigadier General Truman Seymour’s 5,500 Federal troops clashed with Confederate Brigadier General Joseph Finegan’s force at Olustee, Florida. Two Union regiments, the 7th New Hampshire and the 8th United States Colored Troops, gave way in confusion at the opening of the battle. The Confederates, numbering 5,000 strong, attempted to engage the rear element of Seymour’s forces just before nightfall. They were repulsed by elements of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry and the 35th United States Colored Troops, both composed of African-American soldiers. The Federals lost 203 killed; 1,152 wounded and 506 missing for a total of 1,861 lost, about 34 percent of those engaged. The Confederates sustained losses of 93 killed, 847 wounded and 6 missing for an aggregate of 946 casualties, about 19 percent of those engaged. The Federals also lost six artillery pieces and 39 horses that were captured. The Battle of Olustee was the largest Civil War battle fought in the State of Florida.

Sunday February 21, 1864

     Confederate President Jefferson Davis worried about the pressure on the inner bastion of the Confederacy – in Mississippi; against General Joseph E. Johnston in north Georgia; at Charleston, South Carolina; against Lieutenant General James Longstreet in east Tennessee; and, of course, the front in Virginia.

Monday February 22, 1864

Federal Treasury Secretary Salmon P. Chase, again enmeshed in political intrigue, offered once more to resign. The crisis arose from the so-called “Pomeroy Circular,” a document signed by Sen. Samuel C. Pomeroy of Kansas, which advocated for Chase to run against Lincoln for the presidency. Chase, in a letter to the President, denied knowledge of the circular, but admitted consultation with those urging him to run.

Qualified voters in the restored Union government of Louisiana elected Michael Hahn governor of the army-occupied state.

Jeffrey Forrest, the younger brother of Confederate Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest, was killed during the Battle of Ivey’s Farm near Okolona, Mississippi.

Tuesday February 23, 1864

Richmond, Virginia saw a buyer’s panic, with food and whiskey jumping rapidly in price.

President Abraham Lincoln wrote Secretary of Treasury Salmon P. Chase that we would comment more fully later about the Pomeroy circular, in which Chase was advocated as a Republican presidential candidate to replace Lincoln. The Cabinet met without Chase in attendance.

Federal troops of Major General George H. Thomas’s Army of the Cumberland, under Major General J.M. Palmer, drove towards Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston’s position near Dalton, Georgia, with fighting at Catoosa Station and Tunnel Hill, in what is often referred as the Demonstration on Dalton, Georgia.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of February 17-23, 1864 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Fort Snelling prior to mustering out of Federal service.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – At Black River Bridge, Mississippi, for duty during the Meridian Campaign.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive. 

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Battalion veteranized and detached from the 5th Iowa Cavalry, left Alabama and headed to Minnesota, where it arrived on February 25 for duty at Fort Snelling.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A,B,C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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This Week in the American Civil War: February 10-16, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday February 10, 1864

Six horses and ponies died in a fire in the White House stables in Washington. The President attempted to get the animals out, but to no avail.

The Confederate raider Florida came out of Brest, France, after being laid up since August, and evaded the watching U.S.S. Kearsarge. Two blockade-runners were destroyed by the U.S.S. Florida off Masonborough Inlet, North Carolina.

Thursday February 11, 1864

Federal Major General William T. Sherman continued to move upon Meridian, Mississippi.

Fighting broke out near Madisonville, Louisiana, and Lamar, Texas. Meanwhile, a Confederate raid under Major H.W. Gilmor attacked the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad near Kerneysville, West Virginia, throwing a train off the tracks and robbing the crew and passengers.

Friday February 12, 1864

In Missouri, fighting occurred near California House and at Macon. In Arkansas, a skirmish broke out at Caddo Gap, while skirmishes occurred at Wall Hill and Holly Springs, Mississippi as part of Major General William T. Sherman’s Federal Meridian Campaign. 

Saturday February 13, 1864

In the Meridian Campaign, fighting flared between Chunky Creek and Meridian and at Wyatt, Mississippi, as Major General William T. Sherman’s men neared the important Mississippi waypoint.

Sunday February 14, 1864

     MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI FALLS TO FEDERAL FORCES

Federal troops under Major General William T. Sherman entered Meridian, Mississippi, after a march from Vicksburg. General Leonidas Polk’s Confederates continued to fall back. The Federals would spend the next week in the Meridian area destroying railroads and supplies in the area.

Monday February 15, 1864

Confederate President Jefferson Davis was now concerned that Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s forces, which he originally thought was headed towards Mobile, Alabama, might, instead be marching towards Montgomery, Alabama, the former Confederate Capitol. Sherman’s troops were at Meridian.

Tuesday February 16, 1864

Confederate President Jefferson Davis, still concerned over supplies of food and other material his armies needed, solicited suggestions on how to remedy defects in the logistics.

Fighting took place at Lauderdale Springs, Mississippi; Fairfield, North Carolina; and at Indian Bay and Caddo Gap, Arkansas.

Two blockade-runners were halted near Wilmington, North Carolina. The Pet was captured by the blockade while the Spunky was chased ashore and destroyed.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of February 10-16, 1864 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – En route to Fort Snelling for duty and mustering out of Federal service.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in LaGrange, Tennessee to guard Memphis & Charleston Railroad.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Battalion veteranized and detached from the 5th Iowa Cavalry, left Alabama and headed to Minnesota, where it arrived on February 25 for duty at Fort Snelling.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A,B,C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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This Week in the American Civil War: February 3-9, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday February 3, 1864

SHERMAN’S MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI CAMPAIGN BEGINS

With over 26,000 men, Federal Major General William T. Sherman left Vicksburg, Mississippi on an expedition to destroy Confederate-held railroads in the state and to damage the Confederates in and around the city of Meridian. Cooperating with Sherman were 7,600 cavalry. Confederates in Mississippi, under General Leonidas Polk numbered approximately 20,000 and were widely scattered.

Thursday February 4, 1864

Skirmishing became heavier as Major General William T. Sherman’s Federals advanced from Vicksburg through the old battlefields of 1863. General Leonidas Polk’s Confederates fell back before the invaders as fighting broke out at Liverpool Heights, Champion’s Hill, Edwards’s Ferry and near Bolton Depot.

Other action occurred at Moorefield, West Virginia; Columbia, Louisiana along with Hot Springs, Mountain Fork and Rolling Prairie, Arkansas.

Friday February 5, 1864

After a march of eighteen miles, Federal troops marched into Jackson, Mississippi en route to Meridian. Opposed mainly by cavalry, they fought on Baker’s Creek, at Clinton and at Jackson.

In Virginia, skirmishes occurred at Aldie and Winchester. 

Saturday February 6, 1864

Federal troops under Major General William T. Sherman left Jackson, Mississippi and headed to Meridian, while cavalry departed Memphis to assist.

Skirmishes occurred at Hillsborough, Mississippi; Newport Barracks near New Berne, North Carolina; and Bolivar, Tennessee.

Acts which the Confederate Congress approved included a ban on the importation of luxuries and the circulation of U.S. paper money. No cotton, tobacco, naval stores, sugar, molasses or rice could leave ports unless the government received half of the total tonnage.

Sunday February 7, 1864

     Federal troops under Brigadier General Truman Seymour, under the overall command of Major General QuincyA. Gillmore, occupied Jacksonville, Florida. Meeting little opposition, the Union troops prepared to advance inland.

In Mississippi, Major General William T. Sherman’s men moved towards Meridian with skirmishing occurring at Brandon, Morton and Satraria. General Leonidas Polk’s Confederates fell back slowly offering only moderate opposition.

Monday February 8, 1864

Federals and Confederates skirmished at Ten-Mile Run near Camp Finegan as the Florida expedition advanced from Jacksonville.

Major General William T. Sherman’s Federals skirmished at Coldwater Ferry and near Senatobia, Mississippi.

Fighting also occurred at Barboursville, Kentucky; Ringgold, Georgia; near Maryville, Tennessee; and at Donaldsonville, Louisiana.

Tuesday February 9, 1864

Laboriously tunneling their way out of Richmond’s Libby Prison, 109 Federal officers, including Colonel Abel D. Streight, who was captured ten months earlier in Cedar Bluff, Alabama, after his month-long raid into Confederate territory. Eventually 59 of the escapees reached Federal lines, 48 were recaptured and two drowned. The largest and most sensational escape of the war was engineered and led by Colonel Thomas E. Rose of Pennsylvania.

Union troops moving westward from Jacksonville, Florida skirmished near Point Washington.

In the Meridian Campaign, Federals occupied Yazoo City, Mississippi.

Before attending one of the largest White House events of the season, President Abraham Lincoln had several photographs taken by Matthew Brady, including the image that was used on the U.S. Five-dollar bill from 1914 to 1995.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of February 3-9, 1864 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Ordered to Fort Snelling for duty and mustering out of Federal service on Feb. 5, 1864.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in LaGrange, Tennessee to guard Memphis & Charleston Railroad until January 26, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Battalion veteranized and detached from the 5th Iowa Cavalry, left Alabama and headed to Minnesota, where it arrived on February 25 for duty at Fort Snelling.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A,B,C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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This Week in the American Civil War: January 27-February 2, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday January 27, 1864

Confederate President Jefferson Davis asked General Braxton Bragg to come to Richmond, Virginia from Montgomery, Alabama, if his health permitted.

President Abraham Lincoln told Major General Frederick Steele in Arkansas that Steele and the civilian authorities could handle details of the new Arkansas government so long as the free state constitutional provisions were retained.

Fighting on this day included action at Fair Gardens or Kelly’s Ford, and near Knoxville, Tennessee; on the Cumberland River, Kentucky; and near Thoroughfare Mountain, Virginia.

Thursday January 28, 1864

Fighting was light today with a skirmish at Dallas, Arkansas; Lee’s House on Cornersville Pike, Tennessee; and at Jonesville, Virginia.

Friday January 29, 1864

Cavalry skirmished at Medley, West Virginia while Confederates attacked the steamer Sir William Wallace on the Mississippi River, an example of their continuous harassment of Union shipping.

Confederates added the C.S.S. Charleston, a new ironclad, to their defenses.     

Saturday January 30, 1864

Federal Major General William S. Rosecrans superseded Major General John M. Schofield in command of the Federal Department of the Missouri and Major General Frederick Steele assumed full command of the Department of the Arkansas.

Action today included skirmishing at Chickamauga Creek, Georgia; Windsor, North Carolina; and at Medley, West Virginia.

Sunday January 31, 1864

     President Abraham Lincoln told Major General Nathaniel Banks, who was in New Orleans, that he was “at liberty to adopt any rule which shall admit to vote any unquestionably loyal free state men and none others. And yet I do wish they would all take the oath.”

Monday February 1, 1864

President Abraham Lincoln, acting under the congressional conscription act, ordered that 500,000 men be drafted on March 10 to serve for three years or the duration of the war. Furthermore, the President ordered Secretary of War Edwin Stanton to send a transport to the coast of San Domingo to bring back Negro colonists who desired to return. The decision reflected further frustration at Lincoln’s plans for the colonization of Negroes.

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a measure reviving the rank of lieutenant general, after some debate. Congress had Major General Ulysses Grant in mind for the promotion.

Tuesday February 2, 1864

Confederate navy men in small boats captured the U.S. gunboat Underwriter in the Neuse River near New Berne, North Carolina, but were forced to set fire to her and flee.

Near New Beaufort, North Carolina, fighting occurred at Gale’s Creek, Bogue Sound Blockhouse, and Newport Barracks, as Federals drew in their defenses. No further attack was made by Confederates either at New Berne or Beaufort.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of January 27 – February 2, 1864 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – In camp at Stevensburg, Virginia until February 5, 1864.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in LaGrange, Tennessee to guard Memphis & Charleston Railroad until January 26, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Battalion veteranized and detached from the 5th Iowa Cavalry, left Alabama and headed to Minnesota, where it arrived on February 25 for duty at Fort Snelling.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A,B,C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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This Week in the American Civil War: January 20-26, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday January 20, 1864

Federal naval vessels made a reconnaissance of Forts Morgan and Gaines at the mouth of Mobile Bay in Alabama. For some time, Federal Major General Ulysses Grant and others had urged an attack on Mobile, while the Confederates feared such an effort.

Skirmishing broke out at Tracy City, Tennessee, and Island No. 76 on the Mississippi River.

President Abraham Lincoln suspended five scheduled army executions. The president also told Major General Frederick Steele, commanding in Arkansas, that in view of the proposed anti-slavery state constitution, an election should be ordered at once.

Thursday January 21, 1864

Indicative of the trend in many areas of the occupied Confederacy, pro-Northern citizens of Tennessee met at Nashville and proposed a constitutional convention and the abolition of slavery.

Distillation of whiskey was forbidden in the Federal Department of the Ohio, mainly because of the scarcity of grain.

Friday January 22, 1864

In an important shake-up, Major General William Rosecrans was named commander of the Federal Department of the Missouri, replacing Major General John Schofield, who was replaced because of the political uproar between moderate and radical Union men. He was soon placed in command of the Department of the Ohio.

Isaac Murphy was inaugurated provisional governor of Arkansas in the restored pro-Union government, pending elections in the spring. He had been chosen by the State Convention. President Abraham Lincoln told an Arkansas delegation that he would not appoint a separate military governor but would leave administration to Major General Frederick Steele, now in command of the state, until the new state government could be set up. 

Saturday January 23, 1864

President Abraham Lincoln approved a policy where plantation owners would recognize the freedom of their former slaves and hire them by fair contracts in order “to re-commence the cultivation of their plantations.” he urged the military authorities to support such a free-labor system.

The Treasury Department annulled most restrictions upon trade in Kentucky and Missouri.

Sunday January 24, 1864

     While the principal fronts remained quiet, small fights and guerrilla depredations continued. Operations took place near Natchez, Mississippi; Confederates captured Union pickets at Love’s Hill near Knoxville, Tennessee; and a skirmish flared at Tazewell, Tennessee.

Monday January 25, 1864

Federal forces evacuated Corinth, Mississippi, in a move to consolidate their occupation points in the West. Skirmishing occurred at La Grange, Tennessee; Mount Pleasant, Mississippi; Bainbridge Ferry and near the Sweet Water, northern Alabama; and on the Little Missouri River at Sulphur Springs, Arkansas.

Fire destroyed Confederate hospital buildings at Camp winder near Richmond, Virginia.

Tuesday January 26, 1864

President Abraham Lincoln officially approved new trade regulations for dealing with former Confederate territory and for so-called “trading with the enemy.” He also ordered the suspension of execution in nine cases.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of January 20-26, 1864 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – In camp at Stevensburg, Virginia until February 5, 1864.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in LaGrange, Tennessee to guard Memphis & Charleston Railroad until January 26, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Battalion veteranized and detached from the 5th Iowa Cavalry, left Alabama and headed to Minnesota, where it arrived on February 25 for duty at Fort Snelling.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A,B,C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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This Week in the American Civil War: January 13-19, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday January 13, 1864

Confederate President Jefferson Davis told General Joseph E. Johnston at Dalton, Georgia that for the army to fall back would be for the army to fall back would be so detrimental, both military and politically that he trusted that Johnston would “not deem it necessary to adopt such a measure.”

President Abraham Lincoln urged Major General Nathaniel Banks at New Orleans to “proceed with all possible despatch” to construct a free state government for Louisiana and urged Major General Quincy A. Gillmore to do the same in Florida.

Thursday January 14, 1864

Fighting occurred at Dandridge and Middleton, Tennessee; Shoal Creek, Alabama and in Bollinger County, Missouri.

Friday January 15, 1864

     Southern newspapers tried to build up Confederate spirits and gird the people for the struggle that was sure to come.

President Abraham Lincoln continued to pay more attention to reconstruction activities in individual states.

Fighting was confined to a skirmish near Petersburg, West Virginia. 

Saturday January 16, 1864

A fairly severe two-day engagement between cavalry units was fought near Dandridge, Tennessee with considerable casualties. Eventually the Federals withdrew towards Strawberry Plains. Other fighting occurred in White County, Tennessee; Oak Ridge, Mississippi; and near Turkey Creek, Virginia.

Federal Major General Samuel R. Curtis assumed command of the reestablished Department of Kansas.

Sunday January 17, 1864

     Skirmishing occurred at Lewisburg, Arkansas and at Ellis’s and Ely’s Fords, Virginia.

A fire killed two officers in their quarters at Camp Butler, Springfield, Illinois, and destroyed large quantities of quartermaster’s supplies.

Monday January 18, 1864

Substantial opposition to the Confederate conscription law continued to develop in Western North Carolina, and protest meetings were held throughout the winter.

Federals skirmished with Confederate guerrillas at Grand Gulf, Mississippi, while Union pickets drove off Confederates at Flint Hill, Virginia.

Tuesday January 19, 1864

The Arkansas pro-Union Constitutional Convention at Little Rock adopted an anti-slavery measure. The new constitution was ratified by popular vote on March 14.

Skirmishes took place at Branchville, Arkansas, and at Tazewell in east Tennessee.

In Washington, the Lincoln Administration continued to be concerned over the problem of cotton trading with people in the Confederate territory.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of January 13-19, 1864 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – In camp at Stevensburg, Virginia until February 5, 1864.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in LaGrange, Tennessee to guard Memphis & Charleston Railroad until January 26, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Battalion veteranized and detached from the 5th Iowa Cavalry, left Alabama and headed to Minnesota, where it arrived on February 25 for duty at Fort Snelling.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A,B,C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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This Week in the American Civil War: January 6-12, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday January 6, 1864

Confederate guerrillas attacked the steamer Delta on the Mississippi River, one of numerous such incidents occurring on the Western rivers. Skirmishes took place at Flint Hill, Virginia, and at Dalton, Georgia, both areas where the major armies remained at rest.

Until the end of the month, Federal troops under Kit Carson operated against the Navajo Indians from Fort Canby, New Mexico Territory, the Canon de Chelly area. Many Navajos were sent to a reservation at Bosque Redondo in a sad condition.

Thursday January 7, 1864

On Waccamaw Neck, South Carolina, near Charleston, a lieutenant and a private of the 21st Georgia Cavalry captured twenty-five Federal troops. Other fighting occurred at Martin’s Creek, Arkansas and Warrenton, Virginia.

The Confederacy named William Preston as envoy to Mexico.

Federal Judge Caleb Blood Smith, Secretary of the Interior in Abraham Lincoln’s cabinet until December 1862, died in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Friday January 8, 1864

In New Orleans, pro-Union elements convened to consider reconstruction of Louisiana.

David O. Dodd, convicted as a Confederate spy, was executed in Little Rock, Arkansas, in a case which aroused considerable agitation. 

Saturday January 9, 1864

Confederate President Jefferson Davis warned his commanders in Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi of reports that Admiral David Farragut was preparing to attack Mobile and attempt to pass the forts as he had at New Orleans.

A skirmish at Terman’s Ferry, Kentucky, was the only recorded military operation.

Sunday January 10, 1864

     Off the south Atlantic coast the blockade was tighter than ever, with numerous blockade-runners captured by the Federals. However, the blockader U.S.S. Iron Age was lost off Lockwood’s Folly Inlet, North Carolina, after it went aground and was bombarded from land.

Monday January 11, 1864

Senator John B. Henderson of Missouri proposed a joint resolution in the U.S. Senate abolishing slavery throughout the United States by amendment (the Thirteenth) to the Constitution.

Two blockade-runners were captured off of the Florida coast and two others forced ashore and burned off of Lockwood’s Ferry Inlet, North Carolina.

Tuesday January 12, 1864

Skirmishing increased by mid-January but there still was no large-scale fighting. Fighting took place near Mossy Creek, Tennessee; Marshall, Kentucky; Accotink, Ellis’s Ford and a Federal raid operated on Northern Neck, all in Virginia.

A two-day affair occurred at Matamoros, Mexico, where two Mexican factions were warring and Federal troops were sent in to protect and remove the U.S. Consul, L. Pierce.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of January 6-12, 1864 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – In camp at Stevensburg, Virginia until February 5, 1864.

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Ringgold, Georgia until April 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty in Little Rock, Arkansas until April 28, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Huntsville, Alabama until June 22, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in LaGrange, Tennessee to guard Memphis & Charleston Railroad until January 26, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at various Minnesota outposts for garrison duty until June 9, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in St. Louis, Missouri until April 20, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie until May 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Stationed at Rolla, Jefferson City, LaMine Bridge, Warrensburg, Independence, Knob Noster, Kansas City, Waynesville and Franklin with headquarters in Jefferson City until April 14, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison and provost duty at Benton Barracks, Missouri until April 21, 1864.

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On duty at Fort Snelling and at frontier posts throughout Minnesota until May 24, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Battalion veteranized, detached from the 5th Iowa Cavalry, left Alabama and headed to Minnesota, where it arrived on February 25 for duty at Fort Snelling.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A,B,C and D on frontier duty in Pembina until May 5, 1864.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at Vicksburg, Mississippi until April 4, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty at Rossville, Georgia until March 21, 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections of the battery were stationed at Fort Snelling, Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Pembina until June 5, 1864.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – On duty around the Rapidan River, Virginia until May 4, 1864.

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