This Week in the American Civil War: October 5-11, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday October 5, 1864

ENGAGEMENT AT ALLATOONA, GEORGIA

From his perch atop Kennesaw Mountain, Federal Major General William T. Sherman saw the smoke along the railroad to the north towards Chattanooga, indicating the destruction wrecked by Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s army during the past few days. About 18 miles away, Sherman could barely see the combat of major proportions at Allatoona, the site of a railroad pass garrisoned now by Federals under Brigadier General John M. Corse. During the night, Confederate Major General S.G. French’s division slowly moved into position. After a cannonade at dawn, French demanded the garrison to surrender. Corse refused. The Confederates assaulted but did not take Allatoona. During the engagement, Confederates lost 122 killed, 443 wounded and 234 missing for 799 casualties out of just over 2,000 men engaged. Federals sustained losses of 142 killed, 352 wounded and 212 missing for 706 aggregate.

Skirmishing also occurred at Thompson’s Creek, Alexander’s Creek, Atchafalaya and Saint Charles, Louisiana.

President Abraham Lincoln conferred with navy officials regarding naval prisoners, while Confederate President Jefferson Davis and top generals held a rally in Augusta, Georgia.

Thursday October 6, 1864

Confederate cavalry under Thomas L. Rosser attacked two regiments of Federal cavalry under George A. Custer at Brock’s Gap, Virginia, near Fisher’s Hill in the Shenandoah Valley. Custer repulsed the attack but it showed that they were still active in the Valley. Other skirmishing occurred at Florence, Alabama and in Cole County, Missouri.

The Richmond Enquirer printed an article favoring enlisting Negro soldiers into the Confederacy, a view that was receiving popular support.

Friday October 7, 1864

In an attempt to push Federal troops back from their threatening position near Richmond, Virginia, north of the James River, Confederate troops attacked on the Darbytown and New Market roads with action at Johnstown’s Farm and Four-Mile Creek. Fighting erupted on Back Road near Strasburg, and near Columbia Furnace, also in Virginia.      

Saturday October 8, 1864

The last major Confederate cruiser, Sea King or Shenandoah, left London for Funchal, Madeira.

In Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, cavalry fought in the Luray Valley and at Tom’s Brook. Skirmishing also occurred at Rogersville, Tennessee; and near Jefferson City, Missouri.

Sunday October 9, 1864

     After considerable harassment by Confederates in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, Federal Major General Phil Sheridan had A.T.A. Torbert turn against the enemy. At Tom’s Brook, the cavalry divisions of George A. Custer and Wesley Merritt hit Confederate cavalry under Thomas L. Rosser and L.L. Lomax, and captured over 300 Confederate prisoners at the cost of 9 killed and 48 wounded.

Skirmishing occurred at Booneville, Russellville and California, Missouri; Piedmont, Virginia; Bayou Sara, Louisiana; and at Van Wert, Georgia.

Monday October 10, 1864

Federal forces under Major General Phil Sheridan moved north across Cedar Creek in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, and took a strong position on both sides of the Valley Pike, though fighting was limited to skirmishes near Rectortown, Virginia.

Other fighting occurred at Bean’s Station and Gallatin, Tennessee; Valley Station, Colorado Territory; Pemiscot County, Missouri; and Rome, Georgia.

Tuesday October 11, 1864

Elections in Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana showed that the Republicans and Lincoln supporters had stronger support and anticipated. Oliver P. Morton was reelected as governor of Indiana and the Republicans made sizable gains in congressional elections. An anxious President Abraham Lincoln stayed at the War Department telegraph office until after midnight to get the election returns.

On the White River near Clarendon, Arkansas, bushwhackers attacked the steamer Resolute.

Confederate cavalry attacked at Federal Negro recruiting detachment near Fort Donelson, Tennessee, but were driven off.

Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s forces began to concentrate at Rome, Georgia upon receiving word that Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell hood was just below the city.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of October 5-11, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama against Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood until November 3, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10,1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in the Battle of Allatoona, Georgia, and then remained on garrison duty there until November 15, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On the expedition through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Sterling Price until November 15, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On the expedition through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Sterling Price until November 15, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On the expedition through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Sterling Price until November 15, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On the expedition through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Sterling Price until November 15, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned to duty guarding the line of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad from Nashville to the Kentucky line. Companies E, G, and I were at Gallatin, Tennessee. Company A was at Buck Lodge. Company B at Edgefield Junction. Company C at Richland. Company D at Sandersville. Company H was at Mitchellsville. The location of companies F and K are unknown at this time. The regiment remained on duty at these locatiosn until June 25, 1865.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling, until November 17, 1865.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Engaged in frontier and patrol duty between Forts Wadsworth, Abercrombie, Ripley and Ridgely with headquarters at Fort Snelling until May 1866.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of thewar – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Heavy Artillery Battery – Organized at St. Paul and Rochester until February 1865.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – Participated in Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama against Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood until November 3, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On duty as infantry at Fort Irwin, Defenses of Chattanooga until March 30, 1865.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections on duty at Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Fort Sisseton until May 1865.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I – Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865. 

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.  

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

About civilwarweek

Member - Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force, Civil War reenactor and historian since 1993, holds Bachelor's Degree in History from Concordia University-St. Paul, currently pursuing Master's Degree in History at St. Cloud State University and is author of the forthcoming book, "Muskets and Memories: A Modern Man's Journey through the Civil War."
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