This Week in the American Civil War: September 7-13, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday September 7, 1864

Federal Major General William T. Sherman wrote a letter to Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood deeming it in the interest of the United States to call for the evacuation of Atlanta. Over the course of the next week, 446 families left their homes, totaling approximately 1,600 people. Sherman felt the need to evacuate the citizens because he had trouble feeding his own army and didn’t want to risk the burden of additional mouths to feed. This set off a lengthy and heated correspondence between the two generals.

In Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, small Federal and Confederate units skirmished again near Brucetown and Winchester.

Thursday September 8, 1864

In Orange, New Jersey, former Major General George B. McClellan formally accepted the Democratic nomination for President by a letter to the official notification committee.

Only two light skirmishes occurred near Hornersville and Gayoso, Missouri, though a Federal army-navy expedition destroyed fifty-five furnaces at Salt House Point on Mobile Bay in Alabama.

Friday September 9, 1864

President Abraham Lincoln and his Cabinet, still concerned over the serious problems connected with cotton trading with the Confederates, leaned increasingly towards open trading.

Fighting broke out on the Warrensburg Road near Warrensburg, Missouri; at Currituck Bridge, Virginia; and Confederates attacked the steamer J.D. Perry at Clarendon, Arkansas. 

Saturday September 10, 1864

Although the primary fronts were largely quiet, the virtually unknown small wars continued with an affair at Campbellton, Georgia; a skirmish at Woodbury, Tennessee; fighting also occurred near Roanoke, Pisgah, and Dover, Missouri; along with Darkesville, West Virginia. An assault on Confederate works at Chimneys, Virginia also occurred.

A wagon train of emigrants traveling in Dakota Territory were ambushed by Indians, prompting a rescue effort by Federal troops.

Sunday September 11, 1864

    A column of Federal troops comprised of 850 men including 550 infantry, 300 cavalry plus a section of artillery, set out from Fort Rice in Dakota Territory to relieve Captain Fisk’s emigrant train that was ambushed by Indians.

Monday September 12, 1864

Both President Abraham Lincoln and Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant were disturbed over what Lincoln called “a deadlock” in the Shenandoah Valley. Neither Federal Major General Phil Sheridan nor Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early seemed to make any progress in the Winchester, Virginia area.

Skirmishing occurred near Memphis, Tennessee; Caledonia, Missouri; and the Federal troops arrived in Dakota Territory to relieve Captain Fisk of his duty in escorting the emigrants to Idaho.

Tuesday September 13, 1864

Skirmishing in the Shenandoah Valley increased with action at Bunker Hill, near Berryville, Virginia; along with Locke’s and Gilberts’ fords on Opequon Creek. Skirmishing also broke out near Searcy, Arkansas and Longwood, Missouri.

President Abraham Lincoln responded at a political serenade in Washington but made no formal policy statement.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of September 7-13, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – In the Jonesborough, Georgia area until September 29, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty at Allatoona, Georgia until October 5, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Mower’s expedition to Brownsville, Arkansas until September 17, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Mower’s expedition to Brownsville, Arkansas until September 17, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Mower’s expedition to Brownsville, Arkansas until September 17, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Mower’s expedition to Brownsville, Arkansas until September 17, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Organized at Fort Snelling, Minn., until September 20, 1864.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – Relief of Fisk’s Emigrant Train until September 30, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Relief of Fisk’s Emigrant Train until September 30, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Heavy Artillery Battery – Organized at St. Paul and Rochester until February 1865.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty in the Lovejoy’s Station, Georgia area of operations until September 29, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Mounted and engaged in scouting duty around Chattanooga, Tennessee until October 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Various sections on duty at Fort Ridgely, Fort Ripley and Fort Sisseton until May 1865.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I - Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865. 

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.  

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

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This Week in the American Civil War: August 31 – September 6, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday August 31, 1864

Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s Confederate army attacked Federal Major General Oliver O. Howard’s Army of the Tennessee near Jonesborough, south of Atlanta, Georgia. The strong midafternoon drive lacked the effectiveness of previous attacks and was repulsed. Federal losses are estimated at 170 killed and wounded out of an effective strength of 15,000. Confederates lost around 1,725 out of 25,000 who were present for duty.

In Chicago, the Democrats nominated George B. McClellan, the former major general and Army of the Potomac commander, for the nomination to run against President Abraham Lincoln. McClellan received 174 votes on the first ballot to 38 for Thomas H. Seymour, 12 for Horatio Seymour and a few scattered ballots for others. As states changed notes, the revised total was 202.5 for McClellan and 28.5 for Thomas H. Seymour. Clement L. Vallandigham, the exiled Ohio congressman, moved that McClellan’s nomination be unanimous. George H. Pendleton, from Ohio, received the vice-presidential nomination on the second ballot.

Thursday September 1, 1864

ATLANTA EVACUATED BY CONFEDERATES

Explosions and fires broke out at night around Atlanta’s railroad depot and yards. Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood, fearing Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s encircling force to the south at Jonesborough and fearing a direct attack on the City of Atlanta, evacuated, beginning in the late afternoon. Time did not allow them to remove the extensive ammunition and other supplies, so they went up in flames along with a great deal of railroad equipment. Hood was now intent on saving his army for a better day. However, he failed in his major task – to fight and hold Atlanta.

Shortly afternoon noon, the Battle of Jonesborough reopened. After furious fighting, Federals all but eliminated two Confederate brigades, although other forces held on. Losses in the two days at Jonesborough numbered at least 1,450 for the Federals and are unrecorded for the Confederates.

Friday September 2, 1864

Federal Major General William T. Sherman informed President Lincoln that his army had “fairly won” Atlanta. Meanwhile, Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood gathered his army around Lovejoy’s Station, southeast of Atlanta but northwest of Macon, Georgia. Sherman stayed in Atlanta to reorganize and plan, which is what Hood did in Lovejoy’s Station.

Skirmishing occurred elsewhere on the Weldon Railroad in Virginia; The Tannery near Little Rock and near Quitman, Arkansas; Mount Vernon, Missouri; and near Union City, Tennessee. Guerrillas raided near Owensborough, Kentucky. 

Saturday September 3, 1864

President Abraham Lincoln declared September 5th a day of celebration for the victories at Atlanta and Mobile. He also recalled Postmaster General Montgomery Blair, who was at his home in New Hampshire. Members of Congress had been advising Lincoln that Blair be dropped from the Cabinet for his support of Democrats.

Confederate President Jefferson Davis tried to gather troops in Georgia to assist Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood.

In Georgia, Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s army was still in Atlanta while Hood was still licking his wounds at Lovejoy’s Station.

In Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, both armies exchanged captive surgeons and chaplains.

Sunday September 4, 1864

    JOHN HUNT MORGAN KILLED

Famed Confederate raider and cavalry leader John Hunt Morgan was killed by a Federal raiding party in Greenville, Tennessee. The raiding party mirrored Morgan’s own methods, slipped into town early in the morning and shot Morgan while he was trying to rejoin his own men.

Federal Major General William T. Sherman was still in Atlanta pulling in his army for a month-long regrouping and needed rest. Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood was doing the same with his diminishing ranks at Lovejoy’s Station, Georgia.

Elsewhere, fighting broke out at Brownsville, Arkansas, and at Donaldsonville, Louisiana. Confederates attacked the steamers Celeste and Commercial at Gregory’s Landing on the White River, Arkansas.

Monday September 5, 1864

Along the Opequon River in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, portions of Federal Major General Phil Sheridan’s and Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s forces skirmished near Stephenson’s Depot, north of Winchester. Both sides continued to probe to try to catch the other off balance.

Voters of Louisiana who had taken the oath, ratified the new state constitution which included the abolition of slavery.

Tuesday September 6, 1864

The major battle fronts in Virginia, the Shenandoah Valley and in Georgia were quiet.

Maryland’s convention adopted a new constitution that abolished slavery.

Skirmishing broke out at Readyville, Tennessee; Eight Mile Post on the Natchez and Liberty Road in Mississippi; Richland and Searcy, Arkansas; Brunswick, Missouri and a minor bombardment began at Charleston, South Carolina.

Confederate Lieutenant General Richard Taylor assumed command of the Confederate Department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of August 31 – September 6, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in Battle of the Weldon Railroad as part of the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Marched to Atlanta, Georgia and took part in siege operations against that city until August 31, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty at Allatoona, Georgia until October 5, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Veterans rejoined the regiment, which was on Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until Aug. 30, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Organized at Fort Snelling, Minn., until September 20, 1864.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until November 10, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – Participated in the Federal flank movement on Jonesborough, Georgia.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Mounted and engaged in scouting duty around Chattanooga, Tennessee until October 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I - Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865. 

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.  

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

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This Week in the American Civil War: August 24-30, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday August 24, 1864

On the Petersburg, Virginia front, Federals realized that Confederate infantry was building up near the Union troops who were destroying large sections of the Weldon Railroad. Skirmishing broke out near Reams Station and on the Vaughan Road nearby.

Elsewhere, skirmishing flared up at Annandale, Virginia; Huttonsville, Halltown and Sutton, West Virginia. Skirmishing also occurred at Claiborne, Georgia; Gunter’s Prairie, Indian Territory along with Ashley’s and Jones’s Stations near Duvall’s Bluff, Arkansas.

Thursday August 25, 1864

BATTLE OF REAMS STATION

Striking against the Federal infantry destroying the Weldon Railroad south of Petersburg, Virginia, Confederate Lieutenant General A.P. Hill’s Confederate corps defeated Federal Major General Winfield Scott Hancock’s Second Corps in a surprise attack at Reams Station. Federal losses totaled 2,372 and the Confederate casualties were estimated at 720. Over 2,000 of the Federal losses were captured or missing. Hancock’s men withdrew and Hill’s troops returned to the Petersburg defensive line. The Confederate victory did not discourage Federal destruction or the build-up of new westward extension of the Union siege lines around Petersburg.

In Georgia, Federal Major General William T. Sherman began his principal movement to cut off the city of Atlanta completely. Troops marched towards the south side of the Atlanta area, in the general direction of Jonesborough.

Otherwise, skirmishing occurred at Morgan’s Ferry and on the Atchafalaya River, Louisiana.

The C.S.S. Tallahassee ran the blockade into Wilmington, North Carolina after a successful three-week cruise in which she captured thirty-one Federal ships.

Friday August 26, 1864

Threatening East Point, Georgia, south of Atlanta, Federal Brigadier General John M. Schofield’s troops massed and demonstrated as other units of Major General William T. Sherman’s army came into position, endangering Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s last entry lines into and out of Atlanta. Skirmishes took place along the Chattahoochee River at Pace’s Ferry and Turner’s Ferry, Georgia. 

Saturday August 27, 1864

Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s army was ready. Much of it was in position southwest of Atlanta on the Sandtown Road, ready to push farther south and swing east towards Jonesborough to cut Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood’s last railroads into the city. Hood and his Confederates had not been able to interfere with the preparations to any extent. Fighting broke out at Farmer’s Ferry and Fairburn, Georgia.

Sunday August 28, 1864

    Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s army was advancing now. Major General George H. Thomas and the Army of the Cumberland reached Red Oak on the Montgomery and Atlanta or West Point Railroad while Major General Oliver O. Howard and his Army of the Tennessee were near Fairburn on the railroad. Brigadier General John M. Schofield’s Army of the Ohio was near Mount Gilead Church while Major General Henry W. Slocum’s Twentieth Corps held the Union lines around Atlanta. During the advance, fighting broke out at Red Oak and Sandtown.

Monday August 29, 1864

Confederates were on the move again in the Trans-Mississippi as Major General Sterling Price assumed command of a new expeditionary force at Princeton, Arkansas. Price hoped to recover Missouri for the South.

Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s army in Georgia continued its preliminary operations for the major move towards Jonesborough. Skirmishing at Red Oak Station and near Sandtown continued to mark the Confederate probing operations.

The Democratic National Convention gathered in Chicago determined to nominate a candidate who could defeat President Abraham Lincoln and settle the war issues. Committees were formed and the work began. Major General George B. McClellan was the most prominent name being discussed as a presidential candidate.

Tuesday August 30, 1864

Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s army severed one of the last two railroads in Atlanta and marched rapidly towards the Macon line. Atlanta was in dire danger. Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood countered late in the day by sending his own old corps to attack the Federal flank at Jonesborough. Sherman had his three armies separated considerably and they were more than Hood could cover. Fighting broke out near East Point, Flint River Bridge and Jonesborough.

Federal Major General George Crook replaced Major General David Hunter in command of the Federal Department of West Virginia.

The Democrats meeting in Chicago adopted a platform and placed names in nomination for President. Major General George B. McClellan and Thomas H. Seymour, former governor of Connecticut, were named. Senator L.W. Powell of Kentucky and former President Franklin Pierce withdrew their nominations.  The convention adopted, for the most part, the program of the Peace Democrats and Copperheads, a platform diametrically opposed to that of the Lincoln Administration and Radical Republicans.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of August 24-30, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in Battle of the Weldon Railroad as part of the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Marched to Atlanta, Georgia and took part in siege operations against that city until August 31, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty at Allatoona, Georgia until October 5, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Veterans rejoined the regiment, which was on Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until Aug. 30, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Organized at Fort Snelling, Minn., until September 20, 1864.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until November 10, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – Participated in the Federal flank movement on Jonesborough, Georgia.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Mounted and engaged in scouting duty around Chattanooga, Tennessee until October 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I- Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive. 

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

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This Week in the American Civil War: August 17-23, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday August 17, 1864

Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early ‘s troops pushed northward from Cedar Creek, Virginia after Federal Major General Phil Sheridan’s withdrawing army. Sheridan had moved on to the Berryville area, leaving a rearguard at Winchester. In a sharp fight near Winchester, Federal cavalry held well and protected the main column.

In the Petersburg Campaign, Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant indicated to President Abraham Lincoln of his desire to continue the siege of Petersburg without weakening his army.

Thursday August 18, 1864

BATTLE OF THE WELDON RAILROAD BEGINS

The Federal Fifth Corps under Major General Gouverneur K. Warren left the Petersburg lines and moved to the west of the Federal siege positions and occupied over a mile of the vital Weldon Railroad running south from Petersburg. After taking the area around Globe Tavern, Yellow House, and Blick’s Station, Warren turned northward facing Petersburg. Terrain and Confederate Major General Henry Heth’s troops, they were halted in the woods south of the city. Despite the heat and heavy rain, the Federal troops made their first important move since the Battle of the Mine to penetrate towards Petersburg. It cost them 544 killed and wounded plus 292 missing.

In the Shenandoah Valley, Federal Major General Phil Sheridan pulled out of Berryville, Virginia and headed towards Charles Town, West Virginia. When Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early learned of this movement, he moved his forces towards Bunker Hill, north of Winchester. Fighting occurred along Opequon Creek.

Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant, for the second time in the war, refused to exchange Confederate prisoners of war believing that such an exchange would prolong the war. The Confederates urged the exchange on humanitarian grounds and because they could use their men now in Federal hands. Consequently, they were severely strained to feed, house, clothe and guard Federals under their control.

Friday August 19, 1864

BATTLE OF THE WELDON RAILROAD CONTINUES

During the afternoon, troops of Confederate Lieutenant General A.P. Hill’s corps hit Federal Major General Gouverneur K. Warren’s infantry in the dense woods south of Petersburg, Virginia. The Union forces suffered severe casualties and had to pull back towards Globe Tavern, which they had seized the day before. The Federals still held the vital railroad but it came at a high cost of 382 killed and wounded and 2,518 missing. Confederate casualties are uncertain.

Skirmishing occurred near Opequon Creek on the Berryville and Winchester Pike as Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s forces continued to class with the Federal Army of the Shenandoah under Major General Phil Sheridan. 

Saturday August 20, 1864

Despite skirmishing along the Weldon Railroad near Globe Tavern, south of Petersburg, Virginia, the Confederates temporarily suspended their efforts to dislodge the Federal troops in the area. Confederate President Jefferson Davis expressed his distress at the presence of Federal troops on the Weldon Railroad.

In the Shenandoah Valley, skirmishing between Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s forces and Federal Major General Phil Sheridan’s troops continued with action at Berryville and Opequon Creek in Virginia, and at Bulltown, West Virginia.

Fighting occurred at Lovejoy’s Station on the Macon and Western Railroad in Georgia.

Sunday August 21, 1864

    In an early morning raid, Confederate Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest and 2,000 of his men entered the city of Memphis, Tennessee, held it for part of the day and nearly captured Federal Major Generals Cadwallader C. Washburn and Stephen A. Hurlbut. Capturing the generals was one of three aims of Forrest’s raid – the other two being the secured release of Confederate prisoners at Irving Block Prison, and the recall of Federal troops from Northern Mississippi. The raid failed on two of the three accounts. Only the recall of Federal forces in Northern Mississippi was successful.

Lieutenant General A.P. Hill’s Confederate assaulted Federal Major General Gouverneur K. Warren’s Fifth Corps at the Weldon Railroad on another hot and rainy day. Again, the Confederate attack failed, though the Federals lost 301 killed, wounded and missing. The new Federal line held and Confederate General Robert E. Lee had to accept the loss of the northern section of the Weldon Railroad, an invaluable supply line for Richmond and Petersburg. Total losses for the Battle of the Weldon Railroad totaled 198 Federal’s killed, 1,105 wounded and 3,152 missing for an aggregate loss of 4,455 of approximately 20,000 engaged. Confederate losses are estimated at 1,600 out of approximately 14,000 engaged.

Monday August 22, 1864

Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early demonstrated towards Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia with a skirmish occurring at Charles Town, West Virginia. Globe Tavern and the Weldon Railroad were quiet. Other fighting occurred at Jonesborough and Caton, Georgia; Canton and Roaring Spring, Kentucky; Yell County, Arkansas; and Cove Point, Maryland.

Tuesday August 23, 1864

After fierce bombardment by land batteries, three monitors and other Union naval vessels, Fort Morgan, the last major Confederate post at the entrance to Mobile Bay, fell to the Federals. It gave them control of the port, even though the Confederates held the city itself. Now Wilmington, North Carolina remained the only significant port partially open to Confederate blockade-runners.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of August 17-23, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in Battle of the Weldon Railroad as part of the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Marched to Atlanta, Georgia and took part in siege operations against that city until August 31, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty at Allatoona, Georgia until October 5, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Veterans rejoined the regiment, which was on Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until Aug. 30, 1864.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Organized at Fort Snelling, Minn., until September 20, 1864.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until November 10, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty for the Siege of Atlanta until August 25, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Mounted and engaged in scouting duty around Chattanooga, Tennessee until October 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I- Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865.

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.  

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

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This Week in the American Civil War: August 10-16, 1864 

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday August 10, 1864

Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early moved his Confederate forces southward in the Shenandoah Valley from Bunker Hill, West Virginia to Winchester, Virginia. Federal Major General Phil Sheridan’s forces were marching south from the Halltown-Harper’s Ferry area.

Fighting occurred at Lovejoy’s Station, Georgia; Baldwin, Florida; Tallahatchie River, Mississippi; and near Stone Chapel, Virginia.

Three small Federal vessels suffered severely during a two-day duel with Southern artillery at Gaines’s Landing, Arkansas, on the Mississippi River.

The C.S.S. Tallahassee took seven prizes off of Sandy Hook, New Jersey.

Thursday August 11, 1864

Faced with Federal Major General Phil Sheridan’s advancing forces, Lieutenant General Jubal Early pulled his Confederates out of Winchester, Virginia and headed south towards Cedar Creek. Fighting broke out near Winchester, Newtown and at Toll Gate, near White Post.

Federal troops skirmished with Indians near Sand Creek, Colorado Territory.

Friday August 12, 1864

Federal Major General Phil Sheridan moved towards Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s Confederates in the Shenandoah Valley as the Confederates were entrenched along Cedar Creek, south of Winchester, Virginia. A brief skirmish along the creek occurred as both sides probed the lines of the other.

Operations against Indians in the San Andes Mountains of New Mexico and near Fort Garland, Colorado Territory continued.

Alarm spread along the Mid-Atlantic and New England coasts as the Confederate cruiser C.S.S. Tallahassee gathered in six more Federal ships off the coast of New York.

Some politicians in Washington, including Thurlow Weed, informed President Abraham Lincoln of their concerns that he was in danger of being defeated in the upcoming election. 

Saturday August 13, 1864

In Virginia, demonstrations by Federal forces occurred on the north bank of the James River east of Richmond at Four-Mile and Dutch creeks, Deep Bottom, Fussell’s Mill, Gravel Hill, Bailey’s Creek, White’s Tavern, Charles City Road and the New Market Road. The Federals hoped to divert attention from Petersburg and to probe the Confederate defenses. Confederate General Robert E. Lee was attentive but not too concerned about the Federal probing.

In the Shenandoah Valley, fighting broke out at Berryville and near Strasburg as Major General Phil Sheridan’s Federals met resistance from Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s Confederates entrenched at Cedar Creek.

Sunday August 14, 1864

    Skirmishing flared near Strasburg, Virginia in the Shenandoah Valley as Federal Major General Phil Sheridan withdrew his forces from Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s front towards Berryville.

In Georgia, skirmishing occurred near Dalton, at Pine Log Church, and near Fairmount.

Monday August 15, 1864

In Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, more skirmishing occurred at Cedar Creek and Strasburg, Virginia and near Charles Town, West Virginia. Federal Major General Phil Sheridan began his withdrawal from Cedar Creek at night and moved towards Winchester, believing he could not hold the line nor keep his army supplied.

In Georgia, Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s men moved slowly towards Utoy Creek, southwest of Atlanta, fighting on Peachtree Road, at Buchanan, Sandtown and Fairburn.

Confederate cavalry raided the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad in Tennessee.

Lieutenant General Richard Taylor was assigned to command the Confederate Department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana.

The C.S.S. Tallahassee captured six schooners off of the New England coast.

Tuesday August 16, 1864

Cavalry skirmished at Allatoona and Fairburn, Georgia.

Federal Major General Phil Sheridan pulled back successfully towards Winchester with little knowledge of his withdrawal reaching Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early at Cedar Creek, Virginia, despite an engagement at Front Royal.

The C.S.S. Tallahassee took four schooners and a bark off the New England coast.

Federal troops north of the James River in Virginia unsuccessfully attacked Confederate fortifications near Fussell’s Mill.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of August 10-16, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned as provost and depot guard at Marietta, Georgia until Aug. 19, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty at Allatoona, Georgia until October 5, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Veterans on furlough until Aug. 17, 1864. Remainder of regiment remained at Memphis, Tennessee for duty.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Organized at Fort Snelling, Minn., until September 20, 1864.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until November 10, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty for the Siege of Atlanta until August 25, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Mounted and engaged in scouting duty around Chattanooga, Tennessee until October 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I- Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865. 

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.  

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

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This Week in the American Civil War: August 3-9, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday August 3, 1864

Federal land forces landed on Dauphin Island and prepared to take Fort Gaines at the entrance to Mobile Bay. However, the fort remained in Confederate hands guarding the entrance from the west, along with Fort Morgan on the East.

In Georgia, Federal troops increased their pressure on Atlanta by crossing Utoy Creek and fighting at Sunshine Church, Frogtown, Jug Tavern and Mulberry Creek.

Federal  Major General Phil Sheridan arrived in Washington, D.C. to take over the Army of the Shenandoah.

Thursday August 4, 1864

Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s men skirmished at Antietam Ford, Maryland, with action at New Creek, West Virginia, as the Confederate force remained a thorn in the side of Federals in Virginia.

Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant left City Point, Virginia, for Washington, D.C. and Frederick, Maryland, to straighten out plans to thwart Early.

Major General William T. Sherman’s Federals continued crossing Utoy Creek on the west side of Atlanta in their slow extension of the siege line towards the southern side of the city.

Friday August 5, 1864

BATTLE OF MOBILE BAY

In the morning, Admiral David Farragut’s Federal fleet of eighteen ships including four monitors entered Mobile Bay, passing between the forts guarding the three-mile channel. Farragut had his four ironclad monitors in the starboard column led by the U.S.S. Tecumseh and fourteen wooden ships in the port column, with the U.S.S. Brooklyn in the lead and the U.S.S. Hartford as the flagship. The fleet moved in at 5:30 a.m. and Fort Morgan opened up on the Brooklyn shortly after 7 a.m. The Confederate fleet joined in as the U.S.S. Tecumseh headed for the C.S.S. Tennessee. Torpedoes exploded under the Tecumseh, which sank moments later two hundred yards from the enemy. Meanwhile, the remaining vessels passed the ports intact. Three Federal vessels rammed the Tennessee by midmorning. The ironclads opened up on the Tennessee which went out of control. At 10 a.m., the Tennessee surrendered.

During the Battle of Mobile Bay, the Federals lost 145 killed including 93 who drowned on the Tecumseh, 170 were wounded and four captured. Confederates sustained losses of 12 killed, 20 wounded and 270 captured. The U.S.S. Philippi was destroyed, C.S.S. Selma surrendered and the C.S.S. Gaines was sunk. 

Saturday August 6, 1864

With the Federal fleet in Mobile Bay and troops near Fort Gaines, the Confederate’s Fort Powell, guarding a secondary bay entry, was evacuated overnight after being bombarded by the U.S.S. Chickasaw, which then bombarded Fort Gaines.

In Georgia, fighting broke out at Utoy Creek southwest of Atlanta as Federal Major General William T. Sherman attempted to cut the Confederate railroads to the city’s south side.

Sunday August 7, 1864

    Fort Gaines, in Mobile Bay, surrendered to the Federal army on Dauphin Island, but Fort Morgan continued to remain in Confederate hands. Colonel Charles D. Anderson of Fort Gaines was censured by his superiors for raising the white flag of surrender. They believed he should have continued fighting instead of surrender.

Major General Philip H. Sheridan was assigned command of the new Middle Military Division, which included the Middle Department and those of Washington, the Susquehanna and West Virginia. His army became known as the Army of the Shenandoah with the main objective being the elimination of Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s force which was operating in the Shenandoah Valley.

In Washington, Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant, Major General Henry Halleck and Secretary of War Edwin Stanton conferred with President Abraham Lincoln.

Monday August 8, 1864

After considerable confusion among Confederate authorities, Fort Gaines finally surrendered to Federal forces on Dauphin Island in Mobile Bay.

Skirmishing occurred at Fairfax Station, Virginia; Salem, Kentucky; and LaFayette, Tennessee.

Tuesday August 9, 1864

In Virginia, the siege lines at Petersburg were quiet with little activity.

Federal Major General Phil Sheridan prepared his troops for a movement from Halltown and Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia, towards Winchester, Virginia and the Confederate forces under Lieutenant  General Jubal Early.

Major General William T. Sherman’s Federals regrouped and rested for new moves against Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood and the city of Atlanta.

At City Point, Virginia, a tremendous explosion rocked the city killing 43, injuring 126 and causing vast property damage. Two Confederate agents smuggled a small box on board a Federal transport. Shortly before noon, the explosive went off. Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant, sitting in front of his tent, was showered with debris but unhurt.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of August 3-9, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned as provost and depot guard at Marietta, Georgia until Aug. 19, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty at Allatoona, Georgia until October 5, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Veterans on furlough until Aug. 17, 1864. Remainder of regiment remained at Memphis, Tennessee for duty.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Mississippi until August 30, 1864.

11th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Organized at Fort Snelling, Minn., until September 20, 1864.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until November 10, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty for the Siege of Atlanta until August 25, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Mounted and engaged in scouting duty around Chattanooga, Tennessee until October 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I- Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865. 

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.  

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

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Indians in the Crater – Remembering the Battle of the Mine, July 30, 1864

by Jeffrey S. Williams

Excerpted from Muskets and Memories: A Modern Man’s Journey through the Civil War

Don't let the Civil War 150th pass you by without reading this book!

Don’t let the Civil War 150th pass you by without reading this book!

By late-June 1864, Pennsylvania coal miners in the 48th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry were discussing what they would do, if they were in charge, to help end the impasse between the two armies. These were the kinds of discussions that most soldiers have when they are in situations like this, even those serving in the military today. The hair-brained schemes they come up with usually come across as something that would never work, never get considered by leadership, and then die a quick death. This idea was to simply dig a tunnel underneath the enemy lines, pack it with explosives and detonate it. After all, the regiment was composed of experienced coal miners from Pennsylvania’s Schuylkill County. In fact, Lieutenant Colonel Henry Pleasants himself spent time as a mining engineer before the war.1

After discussing this with two other engineers, Pleasants brought the matter up to the attention of Brigadier General Robert Brown Potter, commander of the 2nd Division of the IX Army Corps, who requested that Pleasants and a staff officer identify the potential target for a breech in the Confederate lines. Potter wrote the following in a memorandum to Major General Ambrose Burnside, IX Corps commander, “The men themselves have been talking about it for some days and are quite desirous, seemingly, of trying it. If there is a prospect of our remaining here a few days longer I would like to undertake it. If you desire to see Colonel Pleasants I will ride over with him or send him up to you. I think, perhaps, we might do something, and in no event could we lose more men than we do every time we feel the enemy.” Potter and Pleasants were summoned to the Corps commander’s tent on the morning of June 25, just two days after Pleasants first heard about the idea.2

During the meeting, Pleasants estimated that construction would take twelve days once he had all of the tools and supplies necessary, plus six tons of black powder to load into the mine for detonation. Despite some difficulty in his relationship with Major General George G. Meade, Army of the Potomac commander, Burnside gave his consent to begin the preliminary work on the project. Burnside was able to get the final approval for the project from Generals Meade and Grant.3

petersburgcraterPleasants had his men start the work at midnight on June 25 by clearing away some brush from a gully behind the Union trench line and out of Confederate view. After one day of work, the mine’s construction advanced fifty feet, partially induce by the promise of a whiskey ration for each 2.5 hour shift a man completes. The tunnel progressed another forty feet each day, though the whiskey ration was cancelled after the first week. They ran into problems on July 2, when the tunnel’s progress reached 250 feet as they ran into a soft clay formation that nearly collapsed the shaft. The colonel ordered them to dig at an incline figuring that they would get out of the clay and it would provide some drainage for the excess water. He was right on both accounts and the work was resumed.4

Confederate Brigadier General Edward Porter Alexander, the Army of Northern Virginia’s I Corps chief of artillery, thought something was amiss during this time. Alexander had experience in espionage early in the war and noticed that there wasn’t a major trench network built up by the Federals near Elliott’s Salient like there had been elsewhere in the lines, plus the activity of the volleys that were exchanged along that section was more frequent than other sections. The general suspected that some type of underground activity was being conducted and notified General Lee just before the artillery chief departed for a convalescent leave after getting wounded in the hand by a Federal sharpshooter.

Lee Detailed Captain Hugh Douglas, an engineer, with the task of constructing countermines to detect possible Federal mining activity. The Confederate operation was similar to their Union counterparts in the methodology, though terrain and experienced personnel proved to be bigger challenges for Douglas. Even though it appeared that the Confederate countermine operation might be successful, it suffered one serious shortcoming – Douglas failed to dig his mines deep enough.5

The living conditions and lack of food took its toll on the Confederate soldiers at Elliott’s Salient and desertion became a problem. Three deserters from the 49th North Carolina Infantry deserted and were questioned July 17. They disclosed to their Federal interrogators the presence of the Confederate countermine operation. Burnside had deduced that the Confederate operation was in the correct vicinity but was too shallow. Pleasants halted work on the Federal mine for a short time, entered the mine and listened himself, and then ordered his miners to quietly resume work on the side galleries where the powder was to be placed.6

hh13f1Pleasants mine was completed on July 23 after one month of continuous work. From its entrance to the Confederate lines, the tunnel was 511 feet long. The left gallery was thirty-seven feet from the main tunnel while the right gallery was thirty-eight feet from the main. 18,000 cubic-feet of Virginia soil was excavated, all out of the sight of the Confederates. Only one problem remained for the Pennsylvania coal miners, the black powder had not arrived yet.7

Entrance to the mine at the Petersburg National Military Park as it looks today.

Entrance to the mine at the Petersburg National Military Park as it looks today.

A wagon train arrived on July 27 containing 320 kegs of black powder. Each keg weight twenty-five pounds, which meant that eight thousand pounds (four tons) of explosives would be used in the operation instead of the six tons that was originally requested. A work detail ensued that had required the laborers to carry two kegs, each one concealed in a canvas sack, over a mile from the wagon train to the mine’s entrance. Miners then hauled the cargo down the shaft, opened the kegs carefully and poured the black gold into the wooden magazines and connecting troughs in each of the four chambers. Six hours after the process began, the last keg was emptied.8 The mine was completely ready for detonation at 6 P.M. on July 28, once the fuses were put into place and the tamping process completed.9

At 3:15 A.M. on the morning of July 30, Lieutenant Colonel Pleasants lit the fuse. The battle plans were in place, authorization was given, mine was complete and the waiting now began. After an hour with no explosion, Sergeant Harry Reese of Company F, and Lieutenant Jacob Douty of Company K, volunteered to go into the tunnel and figure out the cause of the delay. They discovered that the fuse was extinguished where two lengths of fuse were spliced together. They re-lit the fuse, exited the mine and waited for another half hour. At 4:44 A.M., the flame from the fuse reached the four-tons of black powder.10

***

           Captain Sam Harriman of the 30th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Company A was tasked with raising a new regiment, in March 1864. Harriman was from Somerset, in nearby St. Croix County, not far from the Wisconsin-Minnesota border. He was promoted to the rank of colonel, and had a full regiment mustered for service within two months. They were designated as the 37th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. Though they were still green troops with very little training, the newest regiment of Midwesterners was already in the field guarding a supply wagon from White House Landing on the James River in Virginia to Cold Harbor, northeast of Richmond, by mid-June, only two weeks after the bloody battle at that site. They were attached to the 1st Brigade, 3rd Division of the IX Army Corps.11

            They arrived at the front lines of the Siege at Petersburg late in the afternoon on June 16, and were immediately ordered to move out to support a charge that was to be attempted by another division, though their services were not needed. They tasted combat for the first time the very next day at the Battle of Hare Hill, suffering their first major casualties with forty-four killed in action and ten who later died of wounds.12

Map courtesy of the Civil War Trust

            On the morning of July 30, when the mine built by the 48th Pennsylvania exploded, the men of the IX Corps were prepared to make their advance upon the Confederate salient. “At that time a vast column of smoke mingled with earth, fragments of guns and platforms, logs, sand-bags, gabions and human beings shot towering into the air to an immense heights, gradually subsiding again and followed immediately by a dull, smothered roar which shook the ground for miles round, and was said to have been felt even to City Point,” wrote Major Robert C. Eden of the 37th Wisconsin shortly after the battle. “A pause, in which one might count, perhaps a dozen beats at the wrist, and 85 pieces of heavy artillery opened almost simultaneously on the rebel lines. The enemy was no slow in replying, and soon the light artillery and musketry chimed in, making the noise completely deafening, and the very ground under our feet to vibrate.”13

            The Confederates were surprised and panic-stricken immediately after the explosion but still had enough time to regroup and recover by the time the order was given to the Federal troops to charge, which Eden states was a period “for some minutes.” When the regiment finally attacked, Colonel Harriman and Adjutant C.I. Miltimore led the effort to capture and turn two Confederate artillery pieces against their former owners, but they were recaptured as “the whole place soon became a perfect slaughter house.” The battle lasted until 4 P.M. before the Federal troops withdrew back to their original positions.14

                        The regiment sent 250 soldiers into the battle that morning but only ninety-five attended the roll call that evening. The rest were killed, wounded or missing. Among the dead were at least six Ojibwe Indian privates that served in Company K: Semour Hah-pah-ton-won-i-quette; Meshell Kenosha; Amable Nah-she-kah-appah; Dominique Teco; and Felix Wah-ton-nut plus Benjamin Rubber, who died of wounds. At least six other Ojibwe were wounded and two were taken prisoner. The prisoners later died.15

The regiment was mustered out on July 26, 1865, and arrived in Madison¸ Wisconsin on July 31, 1865, one year and one day after their toughest engagement at the Battle of the Mine, their service now complete.16

Footnotes:

1. Corrigan, Jim. The 48th Pennsylvania in the Battle of the Crater: The regiment of coal miners who tunneled under the enemy. (Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company Inc., 2006), p. 21.

2. Ibid., pg. 22.

3. Ibid., pp. 22-28.

4. Ibid., pp. 33-35.

5. Ibid., pp. 39-41.

6. Ibid., pp. 43-44.

7. Ibid., pp. 44-45.

8. Ibid., pg. 47.

9. Gould, Joseph. The Story of the Forty-Eighth: A Record of the Campaigns of the Forty-Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteer Infantry during the four eventful years of its service in the war for the preservation of the Union. (Philadelphia: Alfred M. Slocum Company, 1908), p. 216.

10. Ibid., pg. 216.

11. Eden, Robert C., The Sword and Gun: A History of the 37th Wis. Volunteer Infantry, From its first Organization to its final Muster Out , (Madison, Wisconsin: Atwood & Rublee, 1865), pp. 7-16.

12. Ibid., pp. 18-23.

13. Ibid., pg. 29-30.

14. Ibid., pp. 31-32.

15. Ibid., pp. 32, 106-109.

16. Ibid., pp. 66-68.

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This Week in the American Civil War: July 27-August 2, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday July 27, 1864

After deciding to lay a partial siege to Atlanta, Federal Major General William T. Sherman sent out several cavalry expeditions to cut the railroads to the south of the city and to harass the Confederates.

Federal Major General Oliver Otis Howard assumed command of the Army of the Tennessee, succeeding Major General John A. Logan, who had temporarily succeeded Major General James B. McPherson, who was killed in the Battle of Atlanta.

Thursday July 28, 1864

BATTLES OF KILLDEER MOUNTAIN AND EZRA CHURCH

Federal Brigadier General Alfred Sully, commander of the District of Iowa as part of Major General John Pope’s Army of the Northwest, engaged 1,600 Dakota Indians at Killdeer Mountain in Dakota Territory as punishment from the 1862 U.S.-Dakota War in Minnesota. Sully formed his forces in a hollow square, which enabled him to fend of several attacks to his flanks and rear. Realizing that Sully’s forces would not be defeated, the Dakota retreated to protect their women and children. Of the 2,200 troops engaged under Sully’s command, three were killed and ten wounded. Dakota suffered 31 casualties in the battle.

In Georgia, as several cavalry raids were underway near Atlanta, Federal Major General William T. Sherman sought to extend his siege lines by sending infantry to the western borders of the city towards the important railroad outlets on the south.  Confederate troops attacked well-entrenched Federals at Ezra Church. They fought from early afternoon until dark before the Confederates withdrew into the fortifications at Atlanta. While the Federals lost just under six hundred casualties, the Confederate losses amounted to a staggering five thousand.

Friday July 29, 1864

A Federal expedition at Petersburg, Virginia forced a shift of some Confederate units away from the lines as the mining operations neared completion. Federal Major General Ambrose Burnside moved troops from his Ninth Corps into position for an attack planned for the next day.

On the Atlanta front, Federal cavalry fought Confederates at Lovejoy’s Station and Smith’s Crossroads in their efforts to wreck the vital southern railroads. 

Saturday July 30, 1864

BATTLE OF THE MINE

For more than a month, members of the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry dug a 586-foot long tunnel under the 400 feet of no-man’s land between the Federal and Confederate lines at Elliott’s Salient on the eastern side of the siege lines at Petersburg, Virginia. Approximately 278 Confederates were killed when the blast went off around 5 a.m. A hole 170 feet long, 70 feet wide and 30 feet deep was left in its wake. However, when the Federal Ninth Corps commenced its attack, Confederate units were able to regroup and repulse the advance. By 8:30 a.m., nearly 15,000 Federals, a line similar in size to the Confederate’s famed “Pickett’s Charge” at Gettysburg, were in the area of the mine. By early afternoon, the Federals were ordered back. The Confederate’s lost around 1,500 killed and wounded in the attack while the Federals paid a high cost of 4,000 casualties.

Confederate cavalry under Lieutenant General Jubal Early entered Pennsylvania once again and demanded $500,000 in currency or $100,000 in gold from the citizens of Chambersburg in reparations for Federal Major General David Hunter’s depredations in the Shenandoah River Valley in Virginia. Since the citizens could not raise such a sum under a short deadline, Chambersburg was set on fire.

Sunday July 31, 1864

    Confederate cavalry, after burning Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, was now fully occupied by Brigadier General William W. Averill’s pursing Federal cavalry. Averill attacked at Hancock, Maryland on the Potomac River, forcing the Confederates to head to Cumberland, Maryland.

At City Point, Virginia, President Abraham Lincoln held a five-hour conference with Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant before heading back to Washington. Meanwhile, at Petersburg, the lines were being reformed by both sides after the previous day’s Battle of the Mine.

Monday August 1, 1864

Confederate forces under Lieutenant General Jubal Early continued to threaten Federals in the Shenandoah River Valley. However, the Federals named Major General Philip H. Sheridan as the new commander of the Army of the Shenandoah with the task of ridding the valley of Early and all Confederates.

In the Petersburg, Virginia-area, the siege continued with a skirmish at Deep Bottom, Virginia, amid indications that Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant would attempt to cut the railroads that were still bringing supplies to Richmond, the Confederate capital.

Tuesday August 2, 1864

Confederate cavalry tangled with Federals again at Hancock, Maryland, as they sought to re-cross the Potomac River after their Chambersburg, Pennsylvania raid. Skirmishing on this front occurred at Old Town, Maryland and at Green Spring Run, West Virginia.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of July 27 – August 2, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned as provost and depot guard at Marietta, Georgia until Aug. 19, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty at Allatoona, Georgia until October 5, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Veterans on furlough until Aug. 17, 1864. Remainder of regiment remained at Memphis, Tennessee for duty.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Memphis, Tennessee until August 1, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in the Battle of Killdeer Mountain, Dakota Territory, while on Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Memphis, Tennessee until August 1, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Memphis, Tennessee until August 1, 1864.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – Participated in the Battle of Killdeer Mountain, Dakota Territory while on Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – Participated in the Battle of Killdeer Mountain, Dakota Territory while on Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until November 10, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty for the Siege of Atlanta until August 25, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Mounted and engaged in scouting duty around Chattanooga, Tennessee until October 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Participated in the Battle of Killdeer Mountain, Dakota Territory while on Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I- Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865. 

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.  

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

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This Week in the American Civil War: July 20-26, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday July 20, 1864

BATTLE OF PEACHTREE CREEK, GEORGIA

Major General George H. Thomas led his Federal Army of the Cumberland over Peachtree Creek heading towards the fortifications of Atlanta, from the north. Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood decided to attack, although there were delays of over three hours. After some success, the fierce Southern assaults failed. Thomas and his men steadfastly held off the frantic Confederates, who charged for about two hours. Approximately 20,000 Federals were engaged with 1,779 killed, wounded and missing. Hood’s Confederates faced losses of 4,796 out of roughly the same number engaged. Hood, who was not present at the battle, failed his first big test in command.

Other action occurred at Leggett’s Hill, Decatur, Flint Hill Church and Howard House, Georgia; Newtown, Philomont and Berryville, Virginia; Blount County, Tennessee; and at Arrow Rock, Missouri.

Thursday July 21, 1864

Confederate Lieutenant General John Bell Hood sent Lieutenant General William J. Hardee’s reinforced corps out of Atlanta on a fifteen-mile night march to the south and then east, to attack the flank and rear of Federal Major General James B. McPherson’s Army of the Tennessee between Atlanta and Decatur. Hood placed the blame of the previous day’s failure at Peachtree Creek squarely on Hardee’s shoulders. Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s three armies were all closing in on the city of Atlanta, making Hardee’s efforts futile. McPherson’s army assaulted Confederate positions on Leggett’s Hill, taking the position despite a valiant defense by Major General Patrick Cleburne’s troops. From the hill, the Federals had a full view of Atlanta.

Friday July 22, 1864

BATTLE OF ATLANTA

After the tiring, hot, night march, Lieutenant General William J. Hardee’s Confederates hit the right flank of Major General James B. McPherson’s Federals between Decatur and Atlanta. During the hard fought battle, Confederate Major General William Henry Talbot Walker and Federal Major General McPherson were both killed in action during the battle, which took place on the city’s east side. The Federals had an effective strength of 34,863 and took casualties amounting to 3,641 killed, wounded and missing. The Confederates engaged 40,438 and took an aggregate loss of approximately 5,500. Fighting took place at the fringes of the battle at Decatur and at Beachtown, along the Chattahoochee River. The Confederates still held Atlanta proper, but the Federals ringed it with unrelenting force. The Siege of Atlanta had now begun. 

Saturday July 23, 1864

Both Federal and Confederate forces in Atlanta rested and repaired their damages from the previous day’s battle and cared for the dying and wounded. The only fighting in the area was a skirmish at Sweetwater, Georgia.

The Louisiana Constitutional Convention adopted a constitution which included an end to slavery, one of the steps necessary to restoring Louisiana to the Union. It would not be ratified for six weeks.

Sunday July 24, 1864

    SECOND BATTLE OF KERNSTOWN

    Marching north on the Valley Pike, Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s entire army headed towards Kernstown, south of Winchester, where Federal Brigadier General George Crook’s Army of West Virginia was in position on the same ground which Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson had struck in 1862 at the First Battle of Kernstown. After a strong initial attack by Early’s forces, Crook became impatient by his divisional commander’s reluctance to attack the Confederate position. Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes, who would later serve as the 19th President of the United States, brought his division up to support the advance, but its flank was slammed by Confederate Major General John C. Breckinridge’s troops who were hiding in a ravine. Hayes’s division took major casualties and retreated back to Winchester. Brigadier General William W. Averill’s Federal cavalry attempted to counterattack the Confederates but were surprised by Confederate cavalry under Brigadier General John C. Vaughn. Most of the Federal troops, disconnected from their units, spent the night in the rain, scattered across the countryside while trying to evade capture.

Monday July 25, 1864

Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s Confederates, in the northern Shenandoah River Valley, followed Federal Brigadier General George Crook’s Army of West Virginia in a heavy rain to Bunker Hill, north of Winchester, Virginia. Fighting erupted at Bunker Hill, Williamsport, Maryland; and at Martinsburg, West Virginia. The Federals were forced to camp on the banks of the Potomac River.

Tuesday July 26, 1864

Federal cavalry under Major General George Stoneman left on a raid from the Atlanta area towards Macon, Georgia. Skirmishing also flared near Decatur on the Atlanta front.

Confederates under Lieutenant General Jubal Early pursued Brigadier General George Crook’s Federals at Falling Waters, West Virginia and at Muddy Branch, Maryland. Crook’s command was attempting to cross into Maryland. Early’s troops then began breaking up the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad near Martinsburg, West Virginia.

Indian scouts under Brigadier General Alfred Sully engaged approximately 30 Dakota warriors near modern-day Richardson, North Dakota as part of Sully’s Expedition in Dakota Territory.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of July 20-26, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned as provost and depot guard at Marietta, Georgia until Aug. 19, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty at Allatoona, Georgia until October 5, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Veterans on furlough until Aug. 17, 1864. Remainder of regiment remained at Memphis, Tennessee for duty.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty in Memphis, Tennessee until August 1, 1864.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Memphis, Tennessee until August 1, 1864.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Memphis, Tennessee until August 1, 1864.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until November 10, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty for the Siege of Atlanta until August 25, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – Mounted and engaged in scouting duty around Chattanooga, Tennessee until October 1864.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I- Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865. 

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.  

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

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This Week in the American Civil War: July 13-19, 1864

MN150Logo_OL_FNLInformation courtesy of the

Minnesota Civil War Commemoration Task Force

(www.mncivilwar150.com and “Minnesota Civil War 150” on Facebook)

 

Major Highlights for the Week

Wednesday July 13, 1864

Frustrated by their inability to break through the defenses of Washington at Fort Stevens, Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s Confederates hurried toward the Potomac River at Leesburg. Federal Lieutenant General Ulysses Grant ordered Major General Horatio Wright to lead the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps in pursuit. A skirmish at Rockville, Maryland marked the retreat and follow-up.

In Georgia, Major General William T. Sherman prepared to advance his whole Federal force across the Chattahoochee River and then around the north side of Atlanta towards Decatur on the east.

Confederate President Jefferson Davis informed General Robert E. Lee that General Braxton Bragg arrived in Atlanta to investigate what Davis believed to be General Joseph E. Johnston’s failure to stop Sherman.

Thursday July 14, 1864

BATTLE OF HARRISBURG, MISSISSIPPI

Major General A.J. Smith’s Federals were at Harrisburg, Mississippi well posted to defend against the forthcoming Confederates, even though defeating Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest was his primary goal. Wave after wave of Confederates attacked, but Forrest’s forces were not destroyed. Even though it was a tactical victory for the Federals, Smith’s forces numbered 14,000 at the onset of battle, but he lost 77 killed, 559 wounded and 38 missing for a total loss of 674. Forrest, meanwhile, lost 1,347 out of nearly 9,500 engaged. However, the real victor was Forrest, who was able to roam again as Smith’s Federals withdrew.

Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s Confederates crossed the Potomac River at White’s Ford and were safely in Virginia at Leesburg. Rear guard actions occurred at Poolesville, Maryland.

President Abraham Lincoln moved back to the Soldier’s Home after the Confederate invasion scare subsided.

Friday July 15, 1864

The Federal army under Major General A.J. Smith stood its ground until the afternoon in the Harrisburg, Mississippi area before it made a slow retreat back towards Memphis, Tennessee with the rationale of being “short on supplies.” Confederate Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s troops followed but failed to engage Smith’s Federals in a major engagement. A skirmish did occur at Old Town Creek, which kept Forrest occupied enough that the Nashville to Chattanooga Railroad, which supplied Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s forces in Atlanta, remained protected.

President Abraham Lincoln was unhappy that Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s troops got away so freely from Washington. 

Saturday July 16, 1864

Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early left Leesburg, Virginia, and headed back towards the Shenandoah Valley, unimpeded except for action near Purcellville and Wood Grove, Virginia.

Federal Major General William T. Sherman’s major move across the Chattahoochee River and around the north side of Atlanta toward Decatur finally got underway. Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston planned to attack while Sherman’s forces moved around the city, when the wings of Sherman’s army might be separated from the center. However, Johnston continued work on fortifications from the Chattahoochee south of Peachtree Creek to the Atlanta and Decatur Railroad. Skirmishing occurred at Turner’s Ferry, Georgia.

President Abraham Lincoln, still interested in possible contacts by Confederate representatives looking for peace, sent his secretary, John Hay, to New York to consult with potential Confederate emissaries.

Sunday July 17, 1864

    Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston received word from Confederate President Jefferson Davis that he was effectively relieved of his duties, and that command of the Department of Tennessee would fall upon the shoulders of Lieutenant General John Bell Hood. Meanwhile, Federal armies in Georgia continued to build pontoon bridges across the Chattahoochee River.

Skirmishing occurred at Vining’s Station, Georgia; Herring Creek, Virginia; Fredericksburg, Missouri; and at Davison’s Ford near Clinton, Louisiana.

Monday July 18, 1864

President Abraham Lincoln issued a call for 500,000 volunteers, emphasizing the need to refill the army’s ranks after severe fighting in Virginia.

In Georgia, General Joseph E. Johnston moved into semiretirement and Lieutenant General John Bell Hood took the reins of the Confederacy’s Army of Tennessee.

At Richmond, Confederate President Jefferson Davis named George A. Trenholm, a wealthy merchant from Charleston, South Carolina, as Secretary of the Treasury¸ a post that Trenholm only reluctantly accepted.

Tuesday July 19, 1864

A series of skirmishes broke out as Major General Horatio Wright’s Federals located Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s Confederate forces near Berryville, Virginia. Skirmishing broke out at Ashby’s Gap and Berry’s Ford, Virginia; along with Darkesville, Charles Town and Kabletown, West Virginia. By nightfall, Early withdrew his force from Berryville towards Winchester, further in the Shenandoah River Valley.

Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of July 13-19, 1864 

Active units:

1st Battalion Minnesota Infantry – Participated in Siege of Petersburg, Virginia until April 2, 1865. 

2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Assigned as provost and depot guard at Marietta, Georgia until Aug. 19, 1864.

3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Pine Bluff, Arkansas until October 10, 1864.

4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On garrison duty at Allatoona, Georgia until October 5, 1864.

5th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Veterans on furlough until Aug. 17, 1864. Remainder of regiment remained at Memphis, Tennessee for duty.

6th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On duty at Helena, Arkansas until Nov. 4, 1864.

7th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Participated in the Battle for Harrisburg, Mississippi.

8th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Tupelo, Mississippi.

10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – On Smith’s Expedition to Tupelo, Mississippi.

2nd Regiment Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

Brackett’s Battalion of Minnesota Cavalry – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until November 10, 1864.

Hatch’s Independent Battalion of Cavalry – Companies A, B, C and D moved to Fort Abercrombie. Companies A and B assigned to garrison at Fort Abercrombie.  Company C assigned to garrison at Alexandria and Pomme de Terre. Company D on patrol duty from Fort Abercrombie to Pembina.  Companies E and F on frontier duty. The battalion would remain in these duty locations for the duration of the war – until April 26, 1866.

1st Minnesota Light Artillery Battery – On duty at the Chattahoochee River north of Atlanta as part of Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign until July 20, 1864.

2nd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – En route to Chattanooga, Tennessee for duty.

3rd Independent Battery Minnesota Light Artillery – On Sully’s Expedition to Dakota Territory until October 15, 1864.

1st United States Sharpshooters Company I- Attached to the 1st Battalion, Minnesota Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia until Feb. 20, 1865. 

2nd United States Sharpshooters, Company A – Participated in the Siege of Petersburg until Feb. 20, 1865.

Inactive units: 

1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry “Mounted Rangers” – Formally mustered out of service on December 7, 1863. Inactive.  

1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry – Mustered out of Federal service on April 29, 1864. Inactive.

Posted in 1864, This Week in the Civil War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment